Is Mpumalanga Safe for Solo Female Travelers?

Mpumalanga is a region with diverse attractions, from wildlife to stunning landscapes, and people are generally friendly. However, as a solo female traveler, it is important to remain conscious of your safety. It's advisable to stick to tourist areas, avoid isolated areas, especially at night, and not to display wealth or valuables. While most of your trip should be enjoyable and safe, standard precautions should be in place.

Safety rating

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How safe is Mpumalanga?

Safety at night:

Safety at night:Unsafe

Mpumalanga, like many other locations, can pose certain risks, especially for solo female travelers at night. While the people are generally friendly and welcoming, crime can be an issue, especially after dark. It's recommended to refrain from walking alone at night. Instead, use trusted transportation services or stay in secure and well-lit areas. Always stay alert and follow local advice regarding safety measures.
Public transportation:

Public transportation:Moderate

Public transportation in Mpumalanga comprises of buses, taxis and trains. While generally considered reliable during the day, caution should be exercised, especially in the night or in less populated areas. Always keep personal belongings close and be aware of your surroundings. Train travel can sometimes be plagued with delays. The minibus taxi is the most common means of transport and can be crowded. For convenience and safety, considering private transportation options like rented cars are oft-recommended.
Street harassment:

Street harassment:Moderate

Mpumalanga is relatively safe during the day but street harassment can occur. It consists mostly of catcalling and unwanted attention. As in many places, it tends to increase at night. It's recommended to take common sense precautions like avoiding isolated areas and not attracting unnecessary attention. It would be beneficial to learn a few basic South African phrases to communicate effectively and confidently.
Petty crimes:

Petty crimes:Moderate

Mpumalanga has an average risk of petty crimes. Whilst it is not uncommon to encounter pickpocketing and theft, especially in crowded places, the prevalence is not as high compared to larger cities. Nevertheless, as a solo female traveler, it is advisable to be conscious of your surroundings, avoid displaying valuable items, and be cautious when navigating through unfamiliar zones.
Tap water:

Tap water:Unsafe

Although the tap water in many regions of South Africa is considered relatively safe to drink, Mpumalanga is subject to inconsistent water quality due to various factors such as insufficient water treatment and waterborne diseases. Therefore, it's better to stick to bottled water or boil tap water for safety.

Is Mpumalanga safe to travel?

Is Mpumalanga safe right now?

Before your visit to Mpumalanga, it's essential to check travel advisories for South Africa, including your home country's official travel advisory. These advisories can provide up-to-date information on safety, health, and any specific considerations for travelers.
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United States Travel AdvisoryExercise a high degree of caution

The United States Government advises exercising increased caution in South Africa due to crime and civil unrest. Check the full travel advisory.
Last updated: February 5, 2024
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Canada's Travel AdvisoryExercise a high degree of caution

**The Canadian Government advises exercising a high degree of caution in South Africa due to the significant level of serious crime.** Check the full travel advisory.
Last updated: June 4, 2024
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Australia's Travel AdvisoryExercise a high degree of caution

The Australian Government advises exercising a high degree of caution in South Africa due to the threat of violent crime. Check the full travel advisory.
Last updated: May 13, 2024

Safety in South Africa