Solo Female Travel in Sao Luis

Sao Luis, the only Brazilian state capital founded by the French, is located in the Northeast region of Brazil. Known for its unique historic architecture, the city exudes a charming blend of French, Portuguese, and Dutch influences, visible in its stunning colonial buildings. The UNESCO World Heritage site, the Historic Centre, showcases an assortment of vividly coloured mansions, cobblestone streets, and decorative tiles imported from Portugal, making it a major attraction. Alongside the architectural grandeur, Sao Luis is acclaimed for its lively reggae scene, rich Afro-Brazilian culture, enchanting folk dance traditions like 'Bumba-meu-boi,' and beautiful natural vistas consisting of pristine beaches, and the picturesque Lencois Maranhenses National Park. Travelers will be captivated by its historical charm, vibrant culture, and the warm hospitality that this tropical city offers.

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Is Sao Luis good for solo travel?

Safety:

Safety:Moderate

Sao Luis poses several challenges to solo female travelers. It struggles with high levels of violent crime, including against tourists, and the threat of pickpocketing or mugging is ever present. While it's a vibrant city with a rich culture, increased vigilance is necessary, especially at night. Public transportation is typically safe, but unregulated taxis should be avoided. Always maintain situational awareness, use reputable accommodation providers, avoid displaying valuable possessions in public, and stick to populated areas.
Transport:

Transport:Moderate

Sao Luis presents a moderate level of travel ease. The city has a range of public transportation options, including buses and taxis. However, the public transportation isn't always reliable, with sometimes long waiting times. There can also be language barriers if you don't speak Portuguese. The city layout can take some time to get used to and certain areas might demand caution, especially for solo female travelers. However, with basic precautions and willingness to adapt, solo traveling around Sao Luis is quite feasible.
Things to do:

Things to do:Interesting

Sao Luis in Brazil offers a good mixture of historical and natural sites to explore. The city is known for its beautiful colonial buildings, particularly in the UNESCO World Heritage listed area of Old Sao Luis. You could spend days wandering its charming streets. In addition to this, Sao Luis is situated near a number of gorgeous beaches which provide opportunities for relaxation, water sports or simply enjoying the scenery. Also, the Lencois Maranhenses National Park is accessible from Sao Luis, a unique landscape of vast sand dunes and seasonal rainwater lagoons. The city itself has a vibrant culture with many local dishes to try and local music to enjoy.
Food:

Food:Excellent

Sao Luis offers a highly diverse culinary landscape where one can savor unique regional flavors. The local cuisine is a blend of indigenous, African and Portuguese influences. Seafood dishes are a specialty, with ingredients straight from the surrounding Atlantic Ocean, while the use of tropical fruits, plants, and spices native to the region offers a distinct and rich flavor. Street food is also a highlight, providing a vast array of options for food enthusiasts. Vegetarian and vegan options are not as prevalent but still available. Overall, the food scene in Sao Luis is worth the exploration and enjoyment.
Budget:

Budget:Moderate

Sao Luis offers a moderate expense level, making it middle-of-the-road when it comes to budget-friendliness. Although typical day-to-day costs like transportation and meals can be affordable, costs might increase when indulging in popular activities like guided tours or visiting higher-end restaurants. On the upside, it's a beautiful city with history and culture worth every penny. Sticking to local markets and public transport can help you keep costs down.

Is Sao Luis worth visiting?

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