Is Copacabana Safe for Solo Female Travelers?

Copacabana, generally appears to be safe for solo female travelers. As with any travel destination, staying alert and aware of one's surroundings is crucial. Petty theft and pickpocketing can be a concern, particularly in crowded areas. Nighttime safety is reasonable but it's suggested to avoid unlit, deserted areas. For the most part, locals are friendly and helpful. Despite this, it's always wise for solo female travelers to exercise caution, avoid displaying valuables, and maintain a low profile.

Safety rating

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Safety index

Safety at night:Unsafe

Copacabana is generally safe during the day, with friendly local residents and a relaxed atmosphere. However, it is not recommended for solo female travelers to walk alone at night. The streets are not very well-lit and many areas could be deserted. Also, keep in mind that while crimes may not be rampant, incidents of pickpocketing and snatching can occur. Always ensure to take necessary precautions to safeguard your valuables and personal safety.

Public transportation:Safe

Public transportation in Copacabana generally tends to be safe and reliable. Buses and minibuses serve as the primary modes of transport. However, basic caution is advised, particularly in crowded places where petty theft can be common. Also, ensure to negotiate taxi prices before you travel to avoid overcharging. It's always important to stay aware of your surroundings and personal belongings. Additionally, while most drivers adhere to safety regulations, some may not, leading to varied experiences.

Street harassment:Low

Copacabana has been reported by various solo female travelers as generally safe and respectful. Street harassment is not a common issue, and locals are often friendly and helpful. However, it is recommended to always be alert and follow general safety practices, especially during the night, to avoid any possible uncomfortable situations.

Petty crimes:Moderate

Copacabana generally enjoys a reputation of being quite safe for visitors. However, like anywhere else, it is not immune to petty crimes such as pickpocketing and purse snatching. These can especially be an issue during local celebrations and at crowded places. It is important to maintain vigilance, not flaunt valuable items, and be cautious where you keep your belongings to prevent such incidents.

Tap water:Unsafe

In Copacabana, it's not recommended to drink local tap water as it may carry some bacteria and pathogens that your body isn't used to, leading to traveler's diarrhea or other health issues. It would be advisable to stick to bottled or purified water for all your drinking needs.

Is Copacabana safe to travel?

Is Copacabana safe for women?

Is Copacabana safe right now?

Before your visit to Copacabana, it's essential to check travel advisories for Bolivia, including your home country's official travel advisory. These advisories can provide up-to-date information on safety, health, and any specific considerations for travelers.
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United States Travel AdvisoryExercise a high degree of caution

The United States Government advises exercising increased caution in Bolivia due to civil unrest. Some areas pose an increased risk. Check the full travel advisory.
Last updated: June 6, 2023
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Canada's Travel AdvisoryExercise a high degree of caution

The Canadian Government advises exercising a high degree of caution in Bolivia. This is due to the ongoing political and social tensions, coupled with frequent illegal roadblocks across the country. Check the full travel advisory.
Last updated: April 19, 2024
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Australia's Travel AdvisoryExercise a high degree of caution

Exercise a high degree of caution in Bolivia due to the threat of violent crime and the risk of civil unrest. Check the full travel advisory.
Last updated: March 27, 2024

Safety in Bolivia